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Christopher Robin

Directed by Marc Forster

In Theaters

The beginning sequence of Christopher Robin brings us to Hundred Acre Wood, where young Christopher is spending his last day with Pooh and the gang before going off to boarding school. The movie then shows us different phases of grown-up Christopher (Ewan McGregor)—meeting his wife Evelyn (Hayley Atwell), going off to war, meeting his daughter Madeline (Bronte Carmichael), and finally ending up at a corporate job. It gives us a glimpse into his busy company life and the strain it puts on his relationship with his family.

 

The weekend they are scheduled to go on a family vacation together, Christopher is forced to stay home and work. It is then he meets Pooh (Jim Cummings), who woke up one morning without his friends around. He finds himself going through the doorway that Christopher once used in order to come visit the Wood. Christopher agrees to help Pooh find his friends, all while helping himself find joy in the simple things. He also figures out a way to create a work-life balance as well as how to deal with woozles.

 

The acting is phenomenal. Everyone plays their parts extremely well, even in the not-so-serious roles. The music is light, not overbearing, and fits well with the scope of the movie. The cinematography is exceptional, with every scene taking on new light and giving viewers great depth into the realm of England and the Hundred Acre Wood.

– Evangeline Murphy

 


Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Directed by Christopher McQuarrie

In Theaters

The sixth movie of the Mission: Impossible series measures up to previous installments. Fallout follows Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his small crew—Benji (Simon Pegg), Luther (Ving Rhames), and newcomer Walker (Henry Cavill)—as they try to weave out the infamous Lane (Sean Harris) and his followers, the Apostles, in order to stop nuclear bombings that could cause catastrophic damage to the world.

 

There is tons of action, along with backstabbing—literally and figuratively—and disguises that have everyone, actors and viewers alike, trying to figure out who’s who. The action is phenomenal—Cruise does more butt-kicking than talking. There are so many fights that you barely have time to take a breath before the next one starts. Plus a scene that takes helicopter fights to a whole new level.

 

The cinematography is fantastic. Many of the chase scenes feel like you are part of them, thanks to the sound effects editing. The score heightens the viewer’s emotion and intensifies each suspenseful moment.

 

There are a couple problems with Fallout, the first being that a few fight scenes almost seem comical—even fake at a certain point. Also, it’s a little predictable. The more the movie went on, the more I could figure out character motives and how certain scenes would play out.

 

Sometimes audiences can guess what will happen next, only to be blindsided by a twist. Not in this case.

– Evangeline Murphy

 

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